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Topic:
Stock exchange listing

       

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 By Rockroby

10/23/2009  12:09PM

Might it be the same people who have tried to get the mine shut down?if so they should all be put in prison.
 By bluejay

10/23/2009  1:51AM

I've been pondering today the 29,100 reported transaction of our shares yesterday at $0.002. The total value of the trade was $5.82. Now, who in their right mind would sell 29,100 shares of the company with strongly inferred gold in the ground on all our claims for the equivalent of a medium sized hero sandwich?

Has someone completely lost their senses? The largest gold pocket ever extracted from the Sixteen to One Mine was 89,000 ounces, or at tonight's last gold price of $1063.30, a grand total of $94,463,700. Is this insane or what? Did someone need a tax loss this year to balance against a sizable gain? The chances of that are slim, at best.

So, could it be true that someone entered a transaction into the grey market reporting system that was erroneous? Why would someone do this? The only reason I can think of is criminal intent.

Mike has told me that he personally signs each certificate to keep a close eye on the buyers. He also told me that our transfer agent is not seeing certificates coming in for cancellation or requests for the issuance of new ones to account for past transactions in the OTC market in New York. So what gives here if the grey market is facilitating reported trades in our company shares but is not the source of certificates or for any requests for new ones?

Everyone I suspect has heard of nake short sales. These are sales where the seller never delivers certificates and buyer never receives them. These so-called trades just never get settled and continue floating around as paper entries only. So in essence, the naked short seller is an illegal issuer of the company's shares.

The brokerage firms once had the practice of delivering the certificates to owners for no charge. Now these same firms discourage owners from taking physical delivery by charging excessive fees. Some transfer fees are as high as $250 each.

Not to get off the subject but the banks today own brokerage companies. By discouraging your having your certificates they keep them, use them for assets on their balance sheets or just intermingle the assets for their own puposes. I would like to state that you should never let another entity get between you and your assets or your money. A good reason for this is because of the expected financial and currency upheavals that are sure to come in following months or a few years ahead in time.

Aside from naked short selling, these crazy low priced so-called transacted prices in our company's shares may be representing something evil. Large connected pools have been used over the centuries in markets for scaring people out of their stock ownership because the shareholders had in fact became fearful over extended dropping prices.

Could the reported transactions of $0.0002 and $0.0005 be unsettling your nerves? Well, if they're not and you know your asset's current value and its potential for much better days, they are meant to.

Let's consider a hypothetical scenario that may satisfy someone's curiosity just to think it over as a possibility as why these low prices do get displayed with some apparent justification. Let's say a behind the curtain interested buyer for the Original Sixteen To One Mine wants to acquire it for pennies on the dollar. How would he go about this. Well, there are ways if you are so inclined:

1- Get a newspaper or a magazine to write a negative article about the company.

2- If the stock is followed by analysts have them write up something, again, negative for the brokerage companies, banks or investment funds to read.

3- Contact State and Federal regulators and put the screws to the company with negative accusations. Lobby those regulators to insure they really get aggressive with the company.

4- Contact the State Attorney's Office or the Justice Department pointing the finger at the company as being an evil doer.

And finally:

5- Pay someone employed by a brokerage firm to put up fictitious stock prices on the company's shares. Have them register as a market maker for those shares. The more inactive the company trading the better. Since brokerage firms, to a large degree, are self regulating then there will always be a door open for criminal activity, just like the banks and the regulators got caught with their fingers in the cookie jar over all their specialized paper trading vehicles and the aftermath that was billed to the American people when the involved players should have all gone to jail. The white shoed boys were supported by Alan Grerenspan years ago to regulate themselves, But we can't put the white shoed boys in jail, can we, say our representatives or we would be giving up our lobbying favors.

The reason why shares are supposedly traded lower in New York for practically zero and there is no effort EVER at arbitrage for profit in our higher local company market is for a very good reason, THE SHARES CAN NOT BE DELIVERED making the New York market a complete sham.
 By Michael Miller

10/21/2009  6:04PM

Bluejay, your observations below struck me like a drill bit hits quartz. Im so pleased to read your thoughts today. Who would sell shares for $0.0002? Let me tell you about a call I received from Bill just before seeing your entry. He is not a shareholder but asked how to become one. He has no stockbroker and wanted to know what to do. The only option for this man is our Stock Market on this FORUM. I had not looked at it in months but saw 5,000 shares were offered for sale in March at $0.45.

Bill was gracious, knowledgeable about gold and offered his observations about the Sixteen to One. We talked about other gold mining opportunities for investors. He said, You, the mine and the company have substance, positive past proof of results, prospects for technological advancement and calculable risk with huge upside. Youve persevered through many obstacles. Great success awaits. Sounds like a fortune cookie insert.

Bill recognized what improved metal detectors will mean for the Sixteen to One. He pointed out how much more gold we will produce from our mine. I explained that funding was the only obstacle for us to complete a better detection system (which will be owned by the Company). He realized what a significant tool this would be throughout the world and its financial benefits to shareholders as we explore other gold deposits.

It is so refreshing when a stranger expresses what those most intimately involved are positive about. Bill said to keep working, somebody out there will eventually awaken to the limitless money making opportunity that exists with our company.

Thanks for taking the time to tell us about this awful sub-penny treatment of Sixteen to One. I found your story very upsetting, especially since there seems no way to stop it.
 By bluejay

10/21/2009  1:15PM

I have been around closely observing stock activity for some amount of years now and know well from experience when prices get extremely over-priced and under-priced. I could cite from numerous occurrences when these events took place.

Today, our shares are being traded for $0.0002 in NY in the obscure dark corners of the OTC market. In the past few days a few thousand shares have traded at $0.0002 and $0.0005. Today, 29,100 traded for $0.0002. If I may say so, this is a complete absurd joke compared to our break-up value guesstimate of $20 million along with placing ZERO premium on the shares for future prospects. What a joke! Our company, more than likely, has more upside leverage than any gold related company in the market today. You know why, because there aren't too many eyes on us. The only ones, it seems, are government recruits from Camp Darth Vader.

The 16 to 1 mine, alone, is worth anywhere from $13 million to $15 million and that was when gold was lower according to a professional familiar with the Alleghany Mining District about three years ago, or so. Sure, we have some debt(along with misguided State employees swinging hammers at our shareholders) and are attempting to get some funds for further exploration but what exploration company doesn't go through these cycles? We are a different type of exploration company, we explore for and we locate gold, not just drill and log core samples. So we are a gold exploration company that gets paid off fast when we locate the small little mother lodes in exploraing the old 16 to 1 mine workings, which she has been providing us and others for years. Is the gold gone? Don't bank on it.

As gold goes higher in the years ahead, someone with a head for future business profits will come to Alleghany and sink millions of dollars into pulling the gold out of the mountain. Maybe, someone with a vision like Rob McEwen makes his appearence in the District and turns everything upside down for the better.

The fact is that over a million ounces of gold have been mined alone from the 16 to 1 Mine and it RESIDES in the midst of other mines in the district that have cashed in their total gold production far in the excess of $1,000,000,000 based on current prices. Yes, that's a billion dollars. AND some ignorant fool wants to sell shares for a phantom price of $0.0002????

Do you really get what this price means? It means at this level you can buy 1,000,000 shares of the company for $200 or the entire company for about $2600.

So, with the last sale in New York of $0.002 versus a breakup value of at least $1.00 a share IMO you tell me, has there ever been a better buy? Unfortunately, you and I can't purchase the shares at these levels because we don't possess a license to steal.

My idea is to enter buy orders at $0.01 and up and see if anything happens. It probably won't, as the grey market for our shares in New York is a maintained slaughter house for the public.
 By cw3343

09/28/2009  12:26PM

I agree with the last post, and will add that some of the OTCBB trades are still doen the old fashioned way - over the phone between "dealers".
Also, trades could be done in-house, where the stock is bought and sold between 2 clients of the same firm, where they can put in any buy and sell price that they wish.
 By bluejay

09/24/2009  9:03AM

cw3342

In the grey market where we find OSTO trading in public markets, if you can call it that, the $0.0001 trades do not represent a lack of higher bids, they represent a license to steal below bona fide buy limits of other public orders. This is just how the grey market works, it's a den of thiefs where bids and offers are not in one centaralized book, so to speak, and are all over the place. The grey market is like going to a flea market on Saturday with dealers in different locations offering to buy and sell at all different prices. I guess, it's just the luck of the draw if you're not shopping the dealers for the best price and yes, somtimes the seller gets hosed as is evidenced with a $0.0001 price.



The BIG problem for un-be-knowing public is they assume the market is centralized like on Exchanges or in a dealer connected network. Little to they know that placing market orders to sell OSTO stock is like putting themselves on the chopping block.
 By cw3343

09/22/2009  4:24PM

The share price should settle at its actual value.

There are exceptions I would think, and I could be mistaken, but if most hold 16to1 for long term then there are very few sellers which creates an inefficient market. Also, few buyers, probably because not enough people know the story of the mine. Also, no market makers, or at least no consistent market makers.

Someone could be just entering sell orders at market, thinking that the shares have no value. Then if there are not enough limit orders to buy, then that could be where some of the .0001 trades are coming from (this is just guessing on my part.

Probably too many "junior gold" stocks out there that are being "hyped", and these might tend to attract more attention with traders than some of the decent companies.

These items plus other issues get in the way of shares settling at whatever "actual value" should be.
 By lj

09/22/2009  1:12PM

I usually buy a stock with every intention of holding it forever. That cost me dearly in 2000, when even some good solid companies were beaten down with the best. Now I have a tendency to sell stuff when the news is especially bad. Works well when the market is going down, since every day that you don't own a share there is a good chance you made the right move. Lately, it's good to hold. I trade enough that holding the certificates wouldn't work for me. The three days to clear rule hurts me occasionally. I bought the shares in Sixteen to One for the long term. I actually held shares in the Brush Creek Mine, that became Jefferson Bootes Enterpises Inc. or something like that. JABI still stares at me when I open my account as a reminder of the mistake. It is valued at 0.00.

I did send Mike the details of my trade. I am not sure what can be done about the share price, except for people to bid the price up. If you put an order in for .08, I'll have to bid .09. Shouldn't the share price finally settle at its actual value to an investor?
 By cw3343

09/22/2009  10:09AM

Street Name means the shares are held in the Brokerage's name, for your benefit.

Most places charge a fee to issue out certificates, and/or a fee to hold certificates in the brokerage's vault in your name (local safekeeping).

Most stocks these days are held in Street Name in order to make it much easier to buy/sell/transfer. Although somewhat disconcerting, this has some advantages, unless you are a long-term holder. (Millions of stock certs were lost in the World Trade Center, they are probably still working on figuring all of that out)

If the fees are not too high, try to get the shares issued out to you in certificate form...
 By lj

09/21/2009  7:32PM

I don't have a single stock certificate for any of the stock that I own. I assume that my brokerage has them. When they take my money for the shares, and charge me a commission, I have to imagine that a real transaction took place. I am out of town, but I will check my account tommorrow and get you whatever information that I can.
 By Michael Miller

09/21/2009  12:37PM

To lj, below:

Do you have a stock certificate? If so, what is the certificate number and when was it signed?
 By lj

09/19/2009  10:48AM

I know a bit about one of the recent trades, since I was a part of it. After hearing about the trading of shares at low prices, I placed a good until canceled order in my brokerage account for 2000 shares a .05, and another for .07. The order has been in place since early spring. On Sept. 11, my order for 2000 @ .07 was filled. The seller either offered only 2000 shares for sale, or there was another buyer at .07 that bought the remainder. My order at .05 would have been filled if the shares were offered at .001. I don't know why the shares were offered at market rather than limit, but I know that there was no collusion between buyer and seller, since I was the buyer. The shares of OSTO are often valued at .00 or .01, currently the price is .0001, I suspect they lose value on the market since there are very few trades. I am still unsure why buying shares through a brokerage is "grey market," but if there are questions about the ethics of the trade I will gladly sell the shares to the Sixteen to One Inc. for the .07 I paid for them. This doesn't answer the question about the .001 share price mentioned in previous posts, but it at least leaves open the possibility that the shares are sold at low prices because someone gives up and puts the shares for sale at market, and they sell for next to nothing.

PS

Thanks to the ladies at the office for directing me to an access point at Kanaka Creek on Thurs. The trout were very very small, but the scenery was beautiful.
 By Michael Miller

09/18/2009  7:50AM

Last night I was the guest speaker at the Nevada County Historical Society meeting in Nevada City. Six shareholders were there. Another six people asked me about buying stock. Finding the right answer was difficult. I repeated our history and said that getting a public market is a desire and in our future. I told them about the Grey Market. Their eyes glazed over, so that failed. I said the Company maintained a market for shareholders and non-shareholders. There is no way to explain (briefly) share selling for $.001. Why would those executing those bogus sales take the chance of exposure?

Answer: quick money or unlikely to get caught or ignorant, maybe more. I wrote the following letter to an experienced gentleman I discovered in researching stock markets. He replied rather tersely you might try to call the SEC if you think there has been misconduct. Obviously I had hoped for more.


Dear Mr. Lofchie,
I just finished your report of May 1, 2008, co-authored with Moises Messulan about SROs. Perhaps you would help us with a problem that haunts the company I have been running since 1983. It is Original Sixteen to One Mine, Inc, (OSTO) incorporated in California in 1911. It is the oldest US gold producing company and longest operating mine in North America. It is also very small
.
When the Pacific Stock Exchange gave up its market, we were one of five companies exclusively listed with no place to go. Currently the Pink sheets show OSTO on its Grey Market. Something very strange has been taking place with trades over the years. Recently 10,000 shares sold for $.0001 a share. The next day 15,000 shares were bought for between $.07 and $.15 for an increase of 70,000%. This concerns us as well as shareholders, who have questions similar transactions.

Ive gotten nowhere from researching rules or ethics applicable to our status and SROs. Are transactions as this unprotected by rules? Your guidance is appreciated. I will reciprocate with one of the best underground experiences you will have at the Sixteen to One mine in Alleghany, California.
Regards,
Michael M. Miller, president

SRO is the self regulatory organization established years ago to assist the SEC by encouraging brokers and dealers to police there own rather than a government agency. Ive written the SEC with our concerns with no success. Why would it bother? We represent the equivalent of an atom of oxygen in the Pacific Ocean to the stock market industry. Keep searching for answers, friends. Its interesting, in a perverse way.
 By bluejay

09/17/2009  11:19PM

Those are our shares Rick.

The grey market for our shares is NY is probably, $0.0001 bid and offered at $0.07. If you can buy 10,000 shares at $0.0001 it'll cost you just one buck. It's quite apparent that this market exists to steal from selling shareholders.

I think it's fairly resonable to state that those shares trading are from street name to street name requiring no name changes at the transfer agent. If someone is short then they just borrow from another member or never even deliver the shares, it happens all the time with the regulators looking the other way.

Setting the price at $0.0001 means a couple of things: The seller is being robbed or the short seller, higher up, is making a demonic profit.

The Canadian markets may be many things but one important aspect they do represent is EXPOSURE. Canadian markets are viewed daily by people around the globe. The grey market in NY might as well be a dead-ended alley full of garbage and two-legged relievers.

I believe someone should start marketing gold specimens to the public as outstanding wealth preservers. I have a fair amount of 16 to 1 gold pieces representing part of our family's core investments against possible devaluation and as a hedge against the continuing destruction of our currency's purchasing power. And to boot, if the government calls in the gold then we're protected as we're only holding mineral specimens.

It is absolutely amazing to me that no one is really interested in buying these beautiful rare gold specimens from us. When somebody wakes up they'll be gone in a flash. You all have an opportunity today, right now. When they are gone, they will be gone forever, locked up as a calamity reserve for someone's future financial security.

Some morning we'll wake up to the news of a currency devaluation along with the banks being closed. When this happens all gold related items will make the adjustment to higher levels as our currency holding in the banks will be worth much less in international terms.

Sure, the FDIC insures our dollar bills in the banks but ONE thing they don't insure is maintaining our purchasing power. It's goes completely beyond my understanding why folks continue to keep their wealth in our currency denominated items when China has basically been calling our financial system a complete sham for many months.

According to the words in the Patriot Act, any gold coins worth more than 2 times their spot price are not considered bullion. The better gold specimens from the mine are worth well in the excess of 2 times spot. So, why wouldn't the specimens qualify for exemption if big brother comes calling for your gold?
 By Rick

09/17/2009  8:29PM

Which stocks?
 By cw3343

09/17/2009  2:30PM

2 more trades today, 414 and 5333 shares, both at $0.0001

Listing on Vancouver may not be a very good idea. From what I have seen, the speculation, maneuvering, etc., is even worse than the OTCBB and/pr Pink Sheets. There are so many "junior golds" listed on Vancouver, that it lends to a lot of email, website, and faxed newsletter "pump & dump" schemes.
 By martin newkom

09/14/2009  2:48PM

I believe there is a bank in
Sacto. Valley, First Northern
Bank (FNRN:BB) that has and
still trades on the OTC bul-
letin board. The bank has been
in business for 100+ years.
I understand the cost to the
issuer is much less than being
on an exchange. One might look
in to the idea.
 By Dave I.

09/12/2009  4:49PM

Have you folks thought about being listed on the Canadian Stock Exchange? There is a greater interest in small mine investment in that nation. Also what is future prospectus of development? A detailed future plan of action to increase production.
 By RyanBaum

09/12/2009  8:28AM

Any update on the note that was due in early Summer and mentioned at the Annual Meeting?

Still no willingness to raise capital from shareholders?
 By bluejay

09/11/2009  6:06PM

Its seems like an appropriate time to expand on common thievery. Gerald Celente recently called these kinds of people, money junkies. They, basically, produce nothing and dealing with them comes at a high price.

Just look what happened with the banks in 1980 when Paul Volcker declared war on inflation and raised interest rates to combat it. During the process the banks were allowed to raise the usuary rates(rates charged on credit cards) from just below 8% to whatever they wanted. Following the taming of inflation Congress conveniently forgot, in the bank's favor, to return the usuary rates back in line with pre inflation conditions.

Ever wonder why we can't get rid of our credit cards? The people who can least afford to give away money are being charged anywhere from 20% to 30% on outstanding balances. And let's say that these banks have direct and indirect ties to the Rothchild's. Our money "fee handouts" to the banks could very well be shipped abroad and not plowed back into local economies.

If the usuary laws were returned to historical normal levels we wouldn't be requiring any DC stimulus packages of which we are getting charged for.

Max Keiser says the money junkies are so entenched in this country that it's like have a serious virus in our A holes that we'll never ever get rid of.

Your only hope in protecting yourselves is by having a good portion of your wealth in gold coins, not in safey deposit boxes, but in your own personal custody. It's time to be creative in storing our treasures.

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