July 27, 2017 
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Topic:
Clips from Alleghany

       

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 By Rick

02/01/2005  6:03PM

Nobody can 'Scoop the Scoop' unless we pleed for more news. (My entry here might just awake the Scoop to speak?)
 By SCOOP

01/24/2005  6:39PM

Scoop thought that he\she could spin a tale, but after reading the last week of FORUM entries, you guys top him/her. Scoop will refrain from joining you and get back to the doctrine of reporting.

So here’s today’s scoop. Joe’s heading continues to dribble gold. It is probably the tail of the gold comet from the pocket in July, so no one should get too excited. Gold is gold and as NOSE for GOLD seems to understand, gold in the muck in Alleghany means go break rock! Go Joe. Reid’s heading, on the other hand, still shows gold; however, today it took a more interesting twist. It is too far from being just a tail of 1400 ounces. Then again maybe God and his helper, Mother Nature, plopped down another pocket. Calculated risk defines this high-grade gold mine.
 By SCOOP

01/21/2005  10:43PM

Scoop has a story for you.

A gas bomb ignited in Michael’s house yesterday. He lit it off in a situation that was not a good one. Wisely he called Rae at the mine office who sensed that what Mike was telling her was likely a lot more serious than he was explaining. Accordingly Rae asked whether David should drive out. The president reported he had been blow up by a gas round and the flames shot thirty feet igniting the couch, now on fire. Everything was okay but maybe it would be okay to bother David to help with the fire. While most everyone in California would dial 911 if their house was on fire and they were singed by the blast, Michael called Rae, not 911. Hmmm.
Miller agreed to this interview with Scoop.

What were you doing that created the explosion? My propane tanks went dry during the heavy snows and remained empty over two weeks. I was bleeding air out of the long lines and must have bled the air too long. Propane puddled in front of me and much farther. When I moved the lighted candle towards the pilot, gases had accumulated and wham. It was loud and horrifying. I rushed what I knew could be volatile and wham. The smell of burning hair, especially your own is not a pleasant smell.

Would you object to calling that a stupid move? No. It was a careless move and stupid.
Would you object to being called stupid? Yes. I have never thought myself stupid, yet I am stupid at times.

It was not a stimulating interview for this Scoop so it ended. The company shipped a seventy-five ounce bar to the refiner. It matches an earlier poured dore bar from earlier gold mined in July. This mine’s low grade ore that is sent to crush averages a half ounce per pound. It is too different from other gold producers to have major relevance. The ore that went to crush would grade at 1000 ounces per ton. Some low grade!
 By SCOOP

01/01/2005  12:12AM

The power faded twice and then went dead. Alleghany has now, much snow. While all the major highways a have been closed through the Sierra, Ridge Road into the camp is plowed and a breeze. Many trucks at the bar for lobster dinner and entertainment for miners and friends. Fewer than expected because of the storms. Underground is the best place to be working.

Just wanted to be the first to extend wishes (for your Mister Pocket) to all readers of Clips from Alleghany and the other topics on the FORUM and to the participants.
 By SCOOP

12/29/2004  2:37PM

A snowstorm hit Alleghany last night and continues today. The mine is operating ( the underground crew doesn’t know or care if a blizzard is raging outside). The 1500 level sump pump died last Wednesday. It is the one pump that takes the water to the drain tunnel, therefore, when it quits no water leaves the mine. Mike took it for repairs and picked it up this morning in Auburn. It is on its way down the 49 winze right now. Cost was $2358.42.

Both heading are active. Some major water leaks and a couple of air leaks have slowed production. The new dry (change room) got a roof yesterday but is probably a couple of weeks from service. The crew had a nice dinner gathering on Thursday and invited me as well as another journalist. There is a good story brewing about the CDAA lawsuit, but Scoop is not the one to cover it.
 By SCOOP

12/11/2004  9:31AM

It was a fascinating week for the mine and the company. On Monday one of the world’s leaders in Radar development placed its 1000-mega hertz machines in the mine between the 800-foot level and the 1000-foot level. It was the most expensive one-day field test underground ever performed at the mine. The equipment was compact and easy to operate. Results are shown in real time as the electrical waves mess with the quartz, gold and wall rock. GPR tested the quartz ten years ago but the strength was max at 100-megs. Penetration and resolution are the results Ian, Mike, Sandor and all the crew are looking for to help them find gold.

The abrupt change in weather and its duration contributed to everyone associated with working the mine getting sick. Sore throat, pressure behind the eyes, dripping mucous and mental lapses reduced production the past ten days.

At the Sixteen to One operation drilling a round is how progress is measured. Footage and tonnage can be measured to evaluate how well the weeks are spent; however moving the muck is how the success of the operation will be deemed. Success is bringing large chunks of quartz veined with gold to the lapidary shop. Where both headings are advancing, moving muck is much more serious problem to handle than breaking rock. Before meeting Mister Pocket in July to the tune of 1400 ounces in a couple of rounds, shot rock was the nemesis to battle. The crew was small, so clearing each round to expose the working face was a headache. Muck was squeezed everywhere it would be out of the way. Current mining is up dip and down dip from numerous concentrations of high-grade mined over the past year. This remains true today.

In bygone years, say seventy years ago, miners would be breaking up the vein with wide spread stoping, as they did in creating the Ballroom. Where Joe is mining, the veins are layered in a complex manner. One vein is carrying gold. Where Reid is mining the quartz is quite bold. When the miners move beyond this block to the north, this mined out area will look like coyote tunnels, not the large Ballroom stope.

Technology and the old ways describe this mining. Demand for gemstone quality gold in quartz makes it necessary to hand sort the muck once the gold is detected in the muck. Jewelry manufactures and retailers prefer firm slabs, which of course brings more money. It is worth the time to produce high quality high-grade.
 By SCOOP

11/22/2004  8:52PM

The miners, who hit the gold in July, are back in their headings. Reid and Joe each shot a round today, the first since the end of the 1400 ounce pocket. Joe drilled a face round in his old and productive heading and Reid loaded and shot a slab round, which he had drilled but not loaded in July. Sniff, sniff, sniff, no signals but the vein looks pretty good.

Ian and pals are redesigning the electric enterance gate to the mine property. Ten years ago a remote gate was installed, which worked real well until one of the young miners drove into it while it was closing. It smashed his windshield, one powerful gate! The miners have a plan, which will be a time saver for everyone. No more stopping, getting out of the trucks, dialing the combination, opening the gate, driving through and closing the gate. Time is needed to break quartz. Breaking rock will always pay at the Sixteen to One. No one knows, however, just how much must be broken , but every time the crew improves its efficiency, the odds increase that gold will again fall into the muck pile.

Mike bought a heavy-duty sand blaster for cleaning the skip and everything else that rusts. David is cleaning the sawdust from gold sales biggest rock saw. In a week or so, Scoop will let you know how much gold was recovered in the sludge. Rae is taking care of her business after their vacation to Mexico. Gold opened at $447 an ounce today.
 By SCOOP

11/19/2004  5:38PM

Alleghany weather is great. Down in the Sacramento valley, a season early fog pattern developed. The fog lone is at Auburn sometimes but it elevated to Grass Valley mid-week. This fog situation is predictable but usually in December and January, when the valley can be socked-in for weeks at a time. During those times the mine experiences warm and sunny shirtsleeve weather, although once the sun disappears, it gets cold.

Now that the weather report is out of the way, how was the week? MSHA visited the mine for its regular inspections. Three citations (non S&S) were written. The miners feel uncomfortable with two of them. The other was a citation for a worker working on the side of the waste dump without a safety rope. If the guy slipped, he could have rolled down the bank and scratched himself up a bit. Safety belts have a place. This could have been a place if the worker had sloppy skills or work habits. The mine stays away from those two characteristics when it hires people. One was a typical judgment call, something that always occurs in construction and mining. Mike should contest it but probably feels it isn’t worth the time. The last one is a clear misunderstanding of the regulation as cited by the inspector. Mike should contest this misreading of the code and its wrongful interpretation by the MSHA administration in Vacaville.

The miners appreciate safety inspectors, when they provide clear vision on real issues. They will even fix stuff that they know is safe but appears to an untrained or unfamiliar eye to violate a code (the inspector’s view). Over building for safety is better than under building. Over building far beyond what is needed, however, is not in anyone’s best interest. Time and money are always limited in any operation and prudent management of available funds and time is in everyone’s best interest.

A load of #1 mine timber was delivered today. The truck and trailer driver did not want to drive his rig beyond the mine gate. Chicken! So, two guys transferred the load, 10,680 board feet of Doug-fir to the mine’s flat bed and drove it to the landing where shareholders meeting are held. The unloading took about four hours. Ian is all over the place with directing the crew. Miners are underground in rehab and preparing the anticipated gold heading for the resumption of breaking quartz. He has guys working on the surface to button down the roads. Guys are redoing the change room and dry. The 49-winze skip is being reinforced. The abandoned upper shop is under construction to once again become a repair center. It was a good week. Oh yes. David and Rae returned to work today from an extended vacation to the Yucatan. The beat goes on.
 By SCOOP

11/05/2004  5:32PM

Sixteen to One miners have a better track record of predictions or projections than weather reporters. The Alleghany vicinity received its second snowstorm, extended rain and unusual cold, much more than the Sacramento weather guessers reported. The “fast moving Alaska storm” ended up circling around parts of northern California. An unexpected low-pressure area caused the cycle to hang on for most of the week. The crew abandoned their surface work and headed underground.

The 1000-foot level between the Tightner Shaft and the Ballroom in nearly finished its rehabilitation. The tons of quartz mined during the months of searching for Mister Pocket are slushed. Today gold was found below the slusher trough (down dip from the 1400 ounces) in the same quartz lenses that contained the pocket. The “yellow brick road” was projected up dip from the pocket. Now it is also predicted down dip. Talk is that Mike is close to giving the miners the okay to resume breaking rock. There are about six week of work day left in this year and another supply of gold will help the year end financials.

By the way, have you checked the SEC filing for last quarter? You can access the third quarter 10-Q by going to “THE COMPANY’ and then the SEC filing. Current liabilities are down. Current assets are up. The Company has a substantial profit for the quarter.

The skip in the 49 winze was removed for servicing. It has run up and down the winze for 18 years. Ian is looking for a sand blaster to knock down the rust, give it a fresh coat of paint so it will still be going up and down another two decades. Does anybody have one in the garage they no longer use?

A new bucket was modified for the Cat 910 front-end loader. Work was completed yesterday. The old one should be sent to some museum as a testimony to the hard times and perseverance shown over the last lean years. The 910, affectionately called “the tea spoon”, is not big enough to handle snow removal. Joe wants the mine to get a Cat 966 or 950. Does anybody have one in the garage they no longer use?
 By SCOOP

11/05/2004  5:31PM

Sixteen to One miners have a better track record of predictions or projections than weather reporters. The Alleghany vicinity received its second snowstorm, extended rain and unusual cold, much more than the Sacramento weather guessers reported. The “fast moving Alaska storm” ended up circling around parts of northern California. An unexpected low-pressure area caused the cycle to hang on for most of the week. The crew abandoned their surface work and headed underground.

The 1000-foot level between the Tightner Shaft and the Ballroom in nearly finished its rehabilitation. The tons of quartz mined during the months of searching for Mister Pocket are slushed. Today gold was found below the slusher trough (down dip from the 1400 ounces) in the same quartz lenses that contained the pocket. The “yellow brick road” was projected up dip from the pocket. Now it is also predicted down dip. Talk is that Mike is close to giving the miners the okay to resume breaking rock. There are about six week of work day left in this year and another supply of gold will help the year end financials.

By the way, have you checked the SEC filing for last quarter? You can access the third quarter 10-Q by going to “THE COMPANY’ and then the SEC filing. Current liabilities are down. Current assets are up. The Company has a substantial profit for the quarter.

The skip in the 49 winze was removed for servicing. It has run up and down the winze for 18 years. Ian is looking for a sand blaster to knock down the rust, give it a fresh coat of paint so it will still be going up and down another two decades. Does anybody have one in the garage they no longer use?

A new bucket was modified for the Cat 910 front-end loader. Work was completed yesterday. The old one should be sent to some museum as a testimony to the hard times and perseverance shown over the last lean years. The 910, affectionately called “the tea spoon”, is not big enough to handle snow removal. Joe wants the mine to get a Cat 966 or 950. Does anybody have one in the garage they no longer use?
 By SCOOP

10/27/2004  9:07AM

The first real snow storm hit Alleghany the past two days. October snow is rare. No one has a full shed of firewood in town. It looks like there will be sunshine for a while and everyone can get busy to prepare for winter.

Electric power stopped yesterday morning. It returned late afternoon but the miners took the day off. It always is interesting to listen to the conversations of a bunch of Sixteen to One miners, sitting around a fire. Mining and gold are the two major topics, probably boring to women and dogs. There is always an abundance of dogs in Alleghany and an absence of women. The dogs don’t seem to mind. Anyway the conversation moved from the likelihood of just where the pocket greater than the 83,000-ounce leader was and how, can or should it be found and mined.

All the guys have seen the maps and have an understanding about the nature of the gold. The Rainbow mine had a huge pocket. It is written to be greater than the 83,000 ouncer off the 800-foot level between the Tightner shaft and Ballroom in the Sixteen. Another area of speculation is below the fault (2400 level in south) where the crew sunk the Eighty-Three Winze in 1995. Up dip from the 83,000 ouncer was suggested, as it is possible to follow the pattern of previously mined pockets and project where additional ones could be. To no ones surprise the evidence supporting the new number one is where the Plumbago and Sixteen to One veins converge. The Red Star area held the high ground for the biggest pocket to be mined in California. (Somewhere on this web site is a list of the ten largest pockets found in California. The Sixteen had a number of them as well as the Oriental, also in the Alleghany Mining District.)

Of particular interest to this reporter were the discussions about sinking a new shaft in the Red Star and the failures in sinking the Eighty-Three Winze in 1995. Progress there was very slow. Three of the miners had worked on the winze and carefully explained how it was done, why it was done that way and collectively the group talked about how it will be different next time. The single biggest afterthought was that the winze was built too large. Sink small and ream up is faster. The five-member management team at the time decided to build the winze to meet future needs. Well, the company grew short of money before the future happened. Drifting on the 2600- foot level began too close to the fault and was rough going. Also it cut down on the backs for mining. The pumps were too small to quickly dewater the winze. The miners spent too much time before they could begin drilling. Another key factor was blasting the full area of the winze each round. No one knew that it would be easier and faster to sink the winze by blasting half of the area each time. It was impressive to hear their candid discussion. This group has learned a thing or two over their experiences in the mine. Planning amongst them and a couple of other miners with years of experience in sinking should pay big rewards. One other thing: this crew is motivated to beat the old record of production. They had better get going because all of them are getting older and time is not on their side.
 By SCOOP

10/15/2004  5:20PM

Warm weather continues. For those in Northern California, you know about the three forest fires. The closest to Alleghany is near Lake Tahoe. The air continues to be smoky from this fire. Weather report said a chance of rain on Sunday, much needed rain to downgrade the current high level of fire danger.

The pump on the 1700-foot level failed Monday. It was repaired ($1468) and the mine was back pumping on Thursday. The water was just below the 2200 foot –level.

Gold Sales continue to cut the quartz from the July pocket. It is beautiful, but many of the slabs are just too heavy for the designs of our jewelry manufacturers. Therefore, $100,000 or so remains unsold. It is a shame to crush the high grade and turn the gold into bullion. The saw sands from the slab saws yielded seventy ounces of “dust” or about $28,000.

The crew continues to fix stuff both underground and on the surface. The company is looking for a couple of miners qualified to work at the Sixteen to One mine. Soon management will unleash the crew to again drill, blast and muck the “kitchen” raise where everyone is confident that another pocket rests beyond the face.
 By SCOOP

10/02/2004  11:53AM

Water was the primary issue last week at the mine, no not underground water and pumping, but the water supply to the mine from the Company’s spring. The steel 20,000-gallon tank developed some holes and was leaking. A smaller tank has been plumb into the system until the large tank is repaired. The problem that required the most labor was a loss in flow to the tanks. The old lines were plugged with rock and silt and in two spots the connections collapsed. The “fix” is simple but time consuming.

Other surface work centers around the portal shop. It no longer resembles its former appearance. A small air compressor was set up so miners needing air when the big system is shut down can get the air they need. Everyone is working to improve efficiency (cut down on electricity and labor). It is a relief to have the time to do the things that were on hold.
 By SCOOP

09/15/2004  5:54PM

No, Scoop was not waiting for someone to ask for his return, but thank you anyway.
All of the Sixteen to One computers were infested with viruses. The Internet server blocked the computers from going on-line. The computers were taken to Grass Valley for a complete cleansing. One machine had 750 viruses. Who does this? Could it be the people paid to rid computers of viruses?

Work is progressing in the Tightner shaft. A mucking machine is ready to be lowered to the 1000 foot level so the crew can prepare the area as a travel way. The objective is to mine the vein between the Ballroom and shaft (not the entire area but those sections with proven features that indicate a high likelihood of gold). No one expects any gold production until later because everyone’s attention is still focused on surface and underground “dead work”. The miners express confidence that more gold will be mined from the area near the July pocket and in the larger area. To them, gold’s existence is proven by earlier production and the lay-of-the-land.

Ray Wittkopp, company geologist, returned from the mining convention in Las Vegas today. He said that the interest in gold was very high. Nobody was promoting diamonds, which is also telling. There are fewer established choices of gold companies for investment than during the bull market or spikes in the 80’s and 90’s. Supply and demand will eventually work through the numbers every time. This bodes well for ORIGSIX.
 By smithsgold

09/11/2004  11:14PM

I hope you guys are finding lots of gold and thats why there hasnt been any new posts.
Good Luck, I enjoy reading about whats going on at the mine.
Congrats on the big find a while back I like the photo of it with the drill hole in it.
 By SCOOP

08/30/2004  10:06PM

Four fires started about 11:35 am on Saturday about twenty miles down the road from Alleghany near Mother Truckers store. Arson anyone? At 3:25 pm power in Alleghany went dead. Although none knew for sure, everyone suspected the power loss was connected to the fires. It was. Power was restored on Sunday about 5:30 pm. Pike, Camptonville, North San Juan also went dark. People get used to power outs during the winter but this was new. It was warm, down right hot. Fortunately, the moon shown bright and the village simmered with the faint glow of candles.
 By SCOOP

08/17/2004  6:38PM

Sparks are flying outside the portal as the miners prepare the equipment necessary to open the Tightner Shaft for transport. Four miners worked outside today and four miners worked underground. The block of unmined vein material between the shaft and the Ballroom has honest potential. When the geology and past production records are reviewed, even a novice newcomer to high-grade gold mining will see the potential. Mining will concentrate near the recent pocket, but the improved via the Tightner access will open the large area up for serious inspection.

Mike sold the fresh cut slab to Orocal yesterday for $36,250. Some of the quartz is very heavy with gold, in fact too heavy to bring in top dollar. The top grade sells for $1,200 per ounce (quartz and gold weight). The demand is greater than what the Company can produce. Cash flow remains a concern of management. It is too soon to throw high-grade into a crusher and turn it into bullion at $400 per ounce.

The MSHA appeal is due August 23. It must be in the hands of the US Ninth Court of Appeals in San Francisco. MSHA is an agency undergoing some appropriate changes in its operation. Taxpayers pay these guys to protect miners and their industry. For almost a decade they were a prime deterrent to the well being of the miners and their profession. Perhaps a favorable court decision will redirect the agency’s interpretation of the laws of the land in a more productive light for all Americans. Time will tell. Also the decision by the Court will be revealing about itself and its understanding of the rights of American businesses.
 By SCOOP

08/14/2004  8:32AM

High grade in the muck pile, always a good sign. Alleghany Days is underway.
 By Rick

08/11/2004  8:34PM

Hey Scoop, we're still excited about the last rock pop! Talk more rock, whether angular or roundy, we're tuned in.
 By SCOOP

08/10/2004  10:47PM

LESS TALK MORE ROCK.......

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© 2017 Original Sixteen to One Mine, Inc.
PO Box 909
Alleghany, California 95910
 

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corp@origsix.com
 

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